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Image by Nicolas Thomas

Museum of the Moon

Thanks for visiting! Below you'll find the Lunar Highlights as presented by the Moon Experts!

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01

Sinus Iridium

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02

Lunar Apennines

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03

Mare Serenitatis: Apollo 11

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04

Clavius

Description:

Damaged circular formation.

Typical Steep slopes riddled bearing crater Blancanus to the South-West.

Very high walls ridden by Porter to the North-East Rutherford to the South-East Clavius K to the South-West and Clavius L to the West.

Large flat floor with Clavius D C N J & JA on an arc of circle. Numerous craterlets whose a chain to the South-West. Lines of crests.

Elger description (1895):

There are few lunar observers who have not devoted more or less attention to this beautiful formation. one of the most striking of telescopic objects. However familiar we may consider ourselves to be with its features. there is always something fresh to note and to admire as often as we examine its apparently inexhaustible details. It is 142 miles from side to side. and includes an area of at least 16.000 square miles within its irregular circumvallation. which is only comparatively slightly elevated above the bright plateau on the W.. though it stands at least 12.000 feet above the depressed floor. At a point on the S.W. a peak rises nearly 17.000 feet above the interior. while on the E. the cliffs are almost as lofty. There are two remarkable ring-plains. each about 25 miles in diameter. associated. one with the N.. and the other with the S. wall. the floors of both abounding in detail. The latter. however. is the most noteworthy on account of the curious corrugations visible soon after sunrise on the outer N. slope of its wall. resembling the ribbed flanks of some of the Java volcanoes. There are five large craters on the floor of Clavius. following a curve convex to the N.. and diminishing in size from W. to E. The most westerly stands nearly midway between the two large ring-plains on the walls. the second (about two-thirds its area) is associated with a complex group of hills and smaller craters. Both these objects have central mountains. In addition to this prominent chain. there are innumerable craters of a smaller type on the floor. but they are more plentiful on the S. half than elsewhere. On the S.E. wall are three very large depressions. On the broad massive N.E. border. the bright summit ridge and the many transverse valleys running down from it to the floor. are especially interesting features. There are very clear indications of 'faulting' on a vast scale where this broad section of the wall abuts on the N. side of the formation.

 

 
Observation:

Apparent size : 115.3"

Interest : Exceptional formation

Observation period: 1 day after First Quarter or Last Quarter

Minimal Instrument: 10x binoculars

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Image by Nicolas Thomas

Museum of the Moon

Museum of the Moon is a touring artwork by UK artist Luke Jerram.

Measuring seven metres in diameter, the moon features 120dpi detailed NASA imagery of the lunar surface. At an approximate scale of 1:500,000, each centimetre of the internally lit spherical sculpture represents 5km of the moon’s surface.

Over its lifetime, the Museum of the Moon will be presented in a number of different ways both indoors and outdoors, so altering the experience and interpretation of the artwork. As it travels from place to place, it will gather new musical compositions and an ongoing collection of personal responses, stories and mythologies, as well as highlighting the latest moon science.

The installation is a fusion of lunar imagery, moonlight and surround sound composition created by BAFTA and Ivor Novello award winning composer Dan Jones. Each venue also programmes their own series of lunar inspired events beneath the moon.

Luke Jerram’s multidisciplinary practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations and live arts projects. Living in the UK but working internationally since 1997, Jerram has created a number of extraordinary art projects which have excited and inspired people around the globe. Jerram has a set of different narratives that make up his practice which are developing in parallel with one another. He is known worldwide for his large-scale public artworks.

More information can be found at:  my-moon.org

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